Business Disputes

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Business Disputes

As former New York State Court of Appeals Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman observed, “Given the longstanding preeminence of New York as a center of commerce, as might be expected, [New York] state throughout its history has also flourished as a center of commercial litigation. The two are inextricably linked, for whatever the human endeavor, disputes are inevitable.” 

Types of Commercial/Business Litigation Claims

Commercial Litigation typically encompasses any type of business-related dispute that could wind up in court. There are certain mainstream disputes that frequently occur, no matter the variation on the type of business which may bring or defend such a litigation. Some of the typical litigation claims include breach of contract; fraud; tortious interference; unfair competition; breach of fiduciary duty; partnership and shareholder disputes; restrictive covenants; non-competition agreements; payment disputes; trade secrets; secured transactions; etc.

Industries Encompassed within Commercial Litigation Proceedings

Virtually any business or industry can bring about a business-related claim, including: family businesses; closely-held corporations; manufacturing; service; real estate; internet; communication; insurance; banking; employment; health care; retail; cyber; internet; government and licensing; telecommunications; construction, etc.

When a Commercial Litigation is Necessary

A business litigation dispute arises after one business alleges that it has been harmed, often financially, as a result of wrongdoing on the part of another business. Again the claims and type of businesses asserting a Commercial Litigation claim is almost limitless, but there are more common claims, including:

  • Non-payment in accordance with a contract;
  • Family Business disputes;
  • Breach of a non-competition agreement by the seller of a business;
  • Down-payment Disputes Incident to a Real Estate Contract;
  • Breach of a Collateral Security Agreement;
  • Theft of trade secrets by a former employee;
  • Unfair competition claim against an industry competitor; 
  • Fraudulent inducement to enter a contract;
  • Confessions of Judgment; 
  • Breach of a Commercial Lease;
  • Financial misconduct by one partner.

If you believe you have a business-related dispute, no matter what industry your business is, please call for a free consultation and speak with one of our attorneys.

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